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Where is Haiti now?


Written by Plant With Purpose on July 11, 2011 in General

by Audrie Peveler
Sometimes I live in a bubble.  I get my five minutes of news after a TV show I watch with my roommate every Wednesday night, and then I get my fill of depressing information so I turn it off.  When all I need is on my university’s campus, it’s easy to live that way.  So when the earthquake hit Haiti a year and half ago, I was, naturally, one of the last to know.  Since then I have been trying to make more of an effort to stay informed on international affairs, and interning with Plant With Purpose has been a medium for that.  
Long before the earthquake, Plant With Purpose was working alongside Haitian rural farmers.  Significant progress was being made.  Then the earthquake hit.  Although the earthquake was primarily focused in Port au Prince, rural farmers are still feeling the aftershock.  As Scott mentioned in his one year blog on the progress in Haiti, many who once lived in the urban jungle sought refuge in the homes of their rural family and friends.  With household sizes doubling and sometimes tripling, the farmers we work with have been pressured into using farming practices that are not sustainable.  These practices don’t just affect the farmers, but everyone who is downstream of the pesticide and fertilizer-infested waters.  Disease has been at an all-time high.  
But there is hope.
The reason Plant With Purpose works on long-term relationship building is precisely for moments like this.  Plant With Purpose didn’t come in after the quake; they had been there over a decade before.  It’s difficult to trust aid that comes in enormous chunks right when the disaster hits.  What is easier to lean on is help from our Haitian Plant With Purpose staff who has been and are still teaching more sustainable agricultural practices.  
In early 2011 alone, 36,273 trees were planted.  Trees restore the soil, and in turn, restore the land and watersheds, providing clean water and more opportunity for growth.  Barren hillsides are thriving.  Over 290 fruit trees have been grafted this year.  Rural farmers are gaining access to credit to use for agricultural endeavors, which is a much healthier way of providing for their now doubled or tripled household sizes.  
Perhaps the question still remains, “Why isn’t Haiti fixed yet?”  And the answer remains: extreme poverty does not have an overnight solution.  No matter how many handouts we give, unless the people learn how to restore their own land, the problem will never be solved.  Tent cities were a necessary solution at the time of the earthquake, but the land is teeming with hope at the prospect of restoration, and not just restoration of the land, but restoration of its people.  
It’s easy to live in a bubble and not think about the rubble that still lies in Port au Prince 1 ½ years later, but we are called to a higher purpose.  The problem in Haiti and in all of the areas Plant With Purpose works in requires long-term commitment.  Trees are our loaves and fish, and your support of Plant With Purpose makes a tangible difference in the lives of those who had no say when catastrophe hit.
 
To learn more and donate to Plant With Purpose’s life-changing programs in Haiti click here. 
by Audrie Peveler
Sometimes I live in a bubble.  I get my five minutes of news after a TV show I watch with my roommate every Wednesday night, and then I get my fill of depressing information so I turn it off.  When all I need is on my university’s campus, it’s easy to live that way.  So when the earthquake hit Haiti a year and half ago, I was, naturally, one of the last to know.  Since then I have been trying to make more of an effort to stay informed on international affairs, and interning with Plant With Purpose has been a medium for that.  
Long before the earthquake, Plant With Purpose was working alongside Haitian rural farmers.  Significant progress was being made.  Then the earthquake hit.  Although the earthquake was primarily focused in Port au Prince, rural farmers are still feeling the aftershock.  As Scott mentioned in his one year blog on the progress in Haiti, many who once lived in the urban jungle sought refuge in the homes of their rural family and friends.  With household sizes doubling and sometimes tripling, the farmers we work with have been pressured into using farming practices that are not sustainable.  These practices don’t just affect the farmers, but everyone who is downstream of the pesticide and fertilizer-infested waters.  Disease has been at an all-time high.  
But there is hope.
The reason Plant With Purpose works on long-term relationship building is precisely for moments like this.  Plant With Purpose didn’t come in after the quake; they had been there over a decade before.  It’s difficult to trust aid that comes in enormous chunks right when the disaster hits.  What is easier to lean on is help from our Haitian Plant With Purpose staff who has been and are still teaching more sustainable agricultural practices.  
In early 2011 alone, 36,273 trees were planted.  Trees restore the soil, and in turn, restore the land and watersheds, providing clean water and more opportunity for growth.  Barren hillsides are thriving.  Over 290 fruit trees have been grafted this year.  Rural farmers are gaining access to credit to use for agricultural endeavors, which is a much healthier way of providing for their now doubled or tripled household sizes.  
Perhaps the question still remains, “Why isn’t Haiti fixed yet?”  And the answer remains: extreme poverty does not have an overnight solution.  No matter how many handouts we give, unless the people learn how to restore their own land, the problem will never be solved.  Tent cities were a necessary solution at the time of the earthquake, but the land is teeming with hope at the prospect of restoration, and not just restoration of the land, but restoration of its people.  
It’s easy to live in a bubble and not think about the rubble that still lies in Port au Prince 1 ½ years later, but we are called to a higher purpose.  The problem in Haiti and in all of the areas Plant With Purpose works in requires long-term commitment.  Trees are our loaves and fish, and your support of Plant With Purpose makes a tangible difference in the lives of those who had no say when catastrophe hit.
 
To learn more and donate to Plant With Purpose’s life-changing programs in Haiti click here. 
by Audrie Peveler
Sometimes I live in a bubble.  I get my five minutes of news after a TV show I watch with my roommate every Wednesday night, and then I get my fill of depressing information so I turn it off.  When all I need is on my university’s campus, it’s easy to live that way.  So when the earthquake hit Haiti a year and half ago, I was, naturally, one of the last to know.  Since then I have been trying to make more of an effort to stay informed on international affairs, and interning with Plant With Purpose has been a medium for that.  
Long before the earthquake, Plant With Purpose was working alongside Haitian rural farmers.  Significant progress was being made.  Then the earthquake hit.  Although the earthquake was primarily focused in Port au Prince, rural farmers are still feeling the aftershock.  As Scott mentioned in his one year blog on the progress in Haiti, many who once lived in the urban jungle sought refuge in the homes of their rural family and friends.  With household sizes doubling and sometimes tripling, the farmers we work with have been pressured into using farming practices that are not sustainable.  These practices don’t just affect the farmers, but everyone who is downstream of the pesticide and fertilizer-infested waters.  Disease has been at an all-time high.  
But there is hope.
The reason Plant With Purpose works on long-term relationship building is precisely for moments like this.  Plant With Purpose didn’t come in after the quake; they had been there over a decade before.  It’s difficult to trust aid that comes in enormous chunks right when the disaster hits.  What is easier to lean on is help from our Haitian Plant With Purpose staff who has been and are still teaching more sustainable agricultural practices.  
In early 2011 alone, 36,273 trees were planted.  Trees restore the soil, and in turn, restore the land and watersheds, providing clean water and more opportunity for growth.  Barren hillsides are thriving.  Over 290 fruit trees have been grafted this year.  Rural farmers are gaining access to credit to use for agricultural endeavors, which is a much healthier way of providing for their now doubled or tripled household sizes.  
Perhaps the question still remains, “Why isn’t Haiti fixed yet?”  And the answer remains: extreme poverty does not have an overnight solution.  No matter how many handouts we give, unless the people learn how to restore their own land, the problem will never be solved.  Tent cities were a necessary solution at the time of the earthquake, but the land is teeming with hope at the prospect of restoration, and not just restoration of the land, but restoration of its people.  
It’s easy to live in a bubble and not think about the rubble that still lies in Port au Prince 1 ½ years later, but we are called to a higher purpose.  The problem in Haiti and in all of the areas Plant With Purpose works in requires long-term commitment.  Trees are our loaves and fish, and your support of Plant With Purpose makes a tangible difference in the lives of those who had no say when catastrophe hit.
 
To learn more and donate to Plant With Purpose’s life-changing programs in Haiti click here. by Audrie Peveler
by Audrie Peveler
 
Sometimes I live in a bubble.  I get my five minutes of news after a TV show I watch with my roommate every Wednesday night, and then I get my fill of depressing information so I turn it off.  When all I need is on my university’s campus, it’s easy to live that way.  So when the earthquake hit Haiti a year and half ago, I was, naturally, one of the last to know.  Since then I have been trying to make more of an effort to stay informed on international affairs, and interning with Plant With Purpose has been a medium for that.  
 
Long before the earthquake, Plant With Purpose was working alongside Haitian rural farmers. Significant progress was being made.  Then the earthquake hit.  Although the earthquake was primarily focused in Port au Prince, rural farmers are still feeling the aftershock.  As Scott mentioned in his one year blog on the progress in Haiti, many who once lived in the urban jungle sought refuge in the homes of their rural family and friends.  With household sizes doubling and sometimes tripling, the farmers we work with have been pressured into using farming practices that are not sustainable.  These practices don’t just affect the farmers, but everyone who is downstream of the pesticide and fertilizer-infested waters.  Disease has been at an all-time high. 
 
 
But there is hope.
 
The reason Plant With Purpose works on long-term relationship building is precisely for moments like this.  Plant With Purpose didn’t come in after the quake; they had been there over a decade before.  It’s difficult to trust aid that comes in enormous chunks right when the disaster hits.  What is easier to lean on is help from our Haitian Plant With Purpose staff who has been and are still teaching more sustainable agricultural practices.  
 
In early 2011 alone, 36,273 trees were planted.  Trees restore the soil, and in turn, restore the land and watersheds, providing clean water and more opportunity for growth.  Barren hillsides are thriving.  Over 290 fruit trees have been grafted this year.  Rural farmers are gaining access to credit to use for agricultural endeavors, which is a much healthier way of providing for their now doubled or tripled household sizes.  
 
Perhaps the question still remains, “Why isn’t Haiti fixed yet?”  And the answer remains: extreme poverty does not have an overnight solution.  No matter how many handouts we give, unless the people learn how to restore their own land, the problem will never be solved.  Tent cities were a necessary solution at the time of the earthquake, but the land is teeming with hope at the prospect of restoration, and not just restoration of the land, but restoration of its people.  
 
It’s easy to live in a bubble and not think about the rubble that still lies in Port au Prince 1 ½ years later, but we are called to a higher purpose.  The problem in Haiti and in all of the areas Plant With Purpose works in requires long-term commitment.  Trees are our loaves and fish, and your support of Plant With Purpose makes a tangible difference in the lives of those who had no say when catastrophe hit.
 
To learn more and donate to Plant With Purpose’s life-changing programs in Haiti click here


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